Pollen grains = beauty. Honeybees help pollinate flowers by spreading these fruitful jewels (think plant sperm) from flower to flower. Honeybees also rely on pollen, a source of protein, to feed their young. The more flowering plants, the more food for bees. Plant some flowers today!
Photos courtesy of AmusingPlanet.com.
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Pollen grains = beauty. Honeybees help pollinate flowers by spreading these fruitful jewels (think plant sperm) from flower to flower. Honeybees also rely on pollen, a source of protein, to feed their young. The more flowering plants, the more food for bees. Plant some flowers today!
Photos courtesy of AmusingPlanet.com.
ZoomInfo
Pollen grains = beauty. Honeybees help pollinate flowers by spreading these fruitful jewels (think plant sperm) from flower to flower. Honeybees also rely on pollen, a source of protein, to feed their young. The more flowering plants, the more food for bees. Plant some flowers today!
Photos courtesy of AmusingPlanet.com.
ZoomInfo
Pollen grains = beauty. Honeybees help pollinate flowers by spreading these fruitful jewels (think plant sperm) from flower to flower. Honeybees also rely on pollen, a source of protein, to feed their young. The more flowering plants, the more food for bees. Plant some flowers today!
Photos courtesy of AmusingPlanet.com.
ZoomInfo

Pollen grains = beauty. Honeybees help pollinate flowers by spreading these fruitful jewels (think plant sperm) from flower to flower. Honeybees also rely on pollen, a source of protein, to feed their young. The more flowering plants, the more food for bees. Plant some flowers today!

Photos courtesy of AmusingPlanet.com.

Think food products labeled “natural” means they are healthy, organic, GMO-free, or chemical free? Think again. In fact, natural doesn’t mean much at all, at least not according to the FDA, which regulates food labeling. This is the FDA’s current stance on “natural”:

From a food science perspective, it is difficult to define a food product that is ‘natural’ because the food has probably been processed and is no longer the product of the earth.

That said, FDA has not developed a definition for use of the term natural or its derivatives. However, the agency has not objected to the use of the term if the food does not contain added color, artificial flavors, or synthetic substances.

Under this definition, high fructose corn syrup is natural. Learn more at foodpolitics.com.

I think I’m wired like a bee scout! Leaving my stable, paying job to raise bees and live out of my truck.  

Bummed about the bees? Bee-researcher Marla Spivak says there are two things we can all do to help bees: plant bee-friendly flowers and don’t contaminate them with pesticides. “Let the small act of planting flowers and keeping them free of pesticides be the driver of large scale change.”

Check out Dr. Spivak’s Ted Talk to learn why bees are disappearing. (Here’s a hint: our flowerless landscape and dysfunctional food system.) Save a bee eat pesticide free!

This is the trouble with bees. They inspire you to quit your office job that required seven years of schooling. Then you haul them in your new truck halfway across the country to work on an organic mountain farm. There you learn how to grow food sustainably, by fostering life instead of harming it. Including the bees — those tiny, beautiful creatures that play matchmaker to the flowers, sweeten our tongues, brighten our nights with candlelight, and heal our wounds.

Honey bees are dying at alarming rates, risking the diversity of our food supply. Can you imagine a world with no apples, coffee, almonds, cherries, watermelons, avocados, mangoes, limes, and more than 100 other crops? Scientists are still not entirely sure what is causing the mass bee deaths, but pesticides — primarily a new class of chemicals called neonicotinoids — are at the top of the list. Their survival is also threatened by the practice of growing a single crop on an extensive area of land called monoculture, the increasing prevalence of genetically modified crops, and the use of chemicals in bee hives. But bees are not the only species at risk — their troubles are our troubles too. Honey bees are our modern-day canaries in the coal mine, signaling a crisis in our industrial food system. The harsh reality is, the agricultural practices we rely on to sustain us may also be destroying us. Sound like enough trouble for you?